Lake Texoma news Archives - Texoma Connect

Lake Texoma Fishing Report – Following the Birds

Fish caught with Brian Prichard on Lake Texoma

By Brian Prichard – Stripers Inc – Nov 28, 2019

Birds, birds, birds everywhere! It is nice to be able to scan the horizon to utilize the the advantage of a bird’s eye view to search for fish, it certainly makes my job easier. November – December is some of the most consistent fishing of the year, bringing home limits of nice fat stripers caught under feeding seagulls is a common occurrence here on Lake Texoma during this time. It is a magical experience to join the fray of the feeding frenzy between fish, bird, and human, and with the booming population of fish, there are plenty of frenzies to join in on around the lake.

Its peaceful during the fall and winter months, children are in school, the serious hunters are in the woods, the fair weather fishermen stay at home and the fish are biting like crazy, which makes this my favorite time of the year to fish. Many days, especially during the week, there are only a hand full of boats on the water allowing us to relax and leisurely follow along with the schools of fish. With fewer boats, we see a lot more wildlife as well. Often we will see deer along the banks, bald eagles, pelicans, loons, and waterfowl are a common sight, a beaver might show itself from time to time and if we are lucky we might even spot an otter.

Seagulls are working all over the lake from shallow along the banks to the middle of the lake and around the river ledges. The chosen method of enticement seems inconsequential as both lures and bait seem to be working equally well at the moment, though as the water temperatures continue to cool lures will become the most productive means of success. My favorite lure is a sassy shad, 4” glow with a heavy 1 ½ oz head, we use these all through out the year but especially during the cooler months. Here in the past few weeks the sassy shad bite has really been turning on, most days that is all we will use.

With the holiday season upon us this is a great time to get your family and friends out on the water; we also offer gift certificates for a memorable holiday gift. These birds will continue to point us to the fish at least until the end of December. I’ve had some of my most memorable trips during this time, chasing birds in the snow and catching 10lb plus fish one after the other, we could only be so lucky if history repeats itself this year. You can book your trip online at www.stripersinc.com or give me a call at (903)815-1609. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

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TPWD Considering Fishing Regulation Changes for Area Lakes

Catfish

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Inland Fisheries management staff are considering changes to freshwater fishing regulations at water bodies located in Cooke, Tom Green, Grayson, and Williamson counties for 2020-21. Staff previewed the potential changes to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission at their meeting this week in Austin.

At Moss Lake near Gainesville in Cooke County, staff are considering modifying the 14-inch minimum length limit for largemouth bass to a 16-inch maximum length limit to encourage the harvest of smaller fish. This change would aim to reduce competition for forage and habitat and improve the growth potential of largemouth bass in the lake. Additionally, this change would reduce confusion for anglers with identification of spotted versus largemouth bass in the lake.

At Lake Texoma and the Texas waters of the Red River below the Denison Dam, staff are considering modifying harvest regulations for blue, channel, and flathead catfish to standardize the regulations for these species on both sides of the reservoir and the river. For blue and channel catfish, the potential changes would specify no minimum length limit, a 15-fish daily bag limit, and anglers could harvest only one blue catfish 30 inches or greater. For flathead catfish, the change would specify no minimum length limit and a five-fish daily bag limit. In addition to standardizing regulations with Oklahoma and making harvest limits less complicated for catfish anglers, the potential changes could increase protection of larger blue catfish on the Texas side of the river.

In January, Inland Fisheries staff will present these possible changes to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission. If the Commission approves, the proposed changes will be published in the Texas Register, which begins the process of official public comment. Prior to that, anglers wishing to comment on the potential changes can direct them to Ken Kurzawski, TPWD Inland Fisheries Director of Information and Regulations, by email at ken.kurzawski@tpwd.texas.gov or phone at 512-389-4591.

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Texas’ Fourth Annual Pollinator BioBlitz

Monarch Butterfly

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department | Austin Texas

For the next two weeks, Texans are invited to take part in the fourth statewide Pollinator BioBlitz. The goal of the BioBlitz, which runs from Oct. 4-20, is to raise awareness of the diversity and importance of pollinators while bringing greater attention to the critical habitat needs of monarchs and native pollinators across the state.

In support of the event, organizations and sites around the state will be hosting a variety of events to get people outdoors to observe pollinators of all types in yards, natural areas, gardens, parks and community centers. Of course, you don’t have to visit a particular site to participate; your very own yard or green space will do.

Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge will be holding Butterfly Garden Walks on October 5th and October 19th. Butterflies and all Texas pollinators have suffered during this hot summer. Now that the weather has begun to cool a bit, the pollinators are out feeding on fall blooming flowers.

“Documented declines in insect populations, particularly pollinators, have brought to the forefront the need to better understand these species and the support they provide Texas rangelands, agriculture and native ecosystems,” says Ross Winton, invertebrate biologist for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “Texas is home to thousands of pollinator species from the iconic monarch down to the smallest solitary bee.”

Citizen scientists involved in projects like this help us gather data on Texas species and the plant communities they are connected to, Winton adds. This helps us learn not only what we have in our great state but also what we need to strive to protect.

The BioBlitz is designed to be fun for all ages, with no experience required. Participants are simply asked to look for pollinators, such as bees, butterflies and moths, as well as nectar-producing plants; photograph or take video of them; and share their discoveries online via Instagram or Facebook using the hashtag #TXPollinators. Plant and insect species may be difficult to identify, so observers are encouraged to post what they know. For example, “Striped bee on Turk’s cap in Mission, Texas” is fine.

Participants are encouraged to take it a step further and help increase the amount of data collected during the peak of fall migration by becoming a citizen scientist. Anyone can sign up and record their observations through the iNaturalist application on their phones or home computers. All pollinators and flowering plants posted between Oct. 4-20 will automatically be included in the 2019 Texas Pollinator BioBlitz Project at https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/2019-texas-pollinator-bioblitz.  There is no cost to participate and the only tools needed are a camera or smartphone and internet access.

In addition to the monarch, 30 species of pollinators have been designated as “Species of Greatest Conservation Need” by TPWD. Native butterflies, bees, moths, bats, hummingbirds, wasps, flies and beetles are essential to healthy ecosystems and sustain native plant species, human food crops and crops for livestock.

To learn more about the importance of pollinators, sign up to be counted, and locate events across the state, visit the Texas Pollinator BioBlitz website at www.tpwd.texas.gov/pollinators.

Participants can also sign up for weekly email updates during the event that will add to the excitement as everyone works together to increase awareness of our pollinators and the availability of their habitat.

Join event partners TPWD, National Butterfly Center, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, National Wildlife Federation, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as we celebrate the importance of pollinators.

It’s easy to get involved. Individuals and families, schools and clubs are all asked to join, observe, identify and share. At this time of year, cooler temperatures across the state also alert bees to eat as much as they can before hibernation begins, so it’s the perfect time to photograph, post and record the insects you see while enjoying the great outdoors.

To view a video news report about the Pollinator BioBlitz, visit https://youtu.be/IamRvnr7218.

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